Audrey by Numeriku

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Tales from the Commonwealth – Second Look

If you didn’t catch it at the end of yesterday’s podcast release, here is the second little trailer for the Fallout 4 mod, which I am tentatively calling “Tales from the Commonwealth.” I had considered a few other names that were less generic, but they didn’t really fit. Since this mod is in the spirit of the Fallout 3 bundle with a bunch of ancillary tales, the name is apropos, or appropriate, I can never figure out which word is more appropriate either.

However, I’m keeping this one a single module because like Interesting NPCs, I plan on keeping many of the quests and NPCs interconnected. Ostensibly meaningless NPCs in one quest will come in to play at times for other quests, and companions will interact with each other during swaps.

I’ll probably release in 3 phases, with early June being the release of Companion Audrey and about a dozen quests with similar themes, and then the second companion and set of quests in July, and the third planned phase being the last companion and non-quest NPCs. After that, I’ll just play it by ear. I’ll also try to focus more on the DLC and companion commentary/interjections for modded quests this time around, I know I neglected it with the Skyrims.

Atomic Radio v1.00

end-of-old-time-radio

Changelog:
– v1.01 – Added radio bumpers

Atomic Radio v1.01

All right, version 1.00 1.01 Atomic Radio is now available for downloading. I would’ve released it earlier, but I was using the old naming convention for archives and I couldn’t figure out what the hell I was doing wrong. Apparently, for Fallout 4 you have to name your file (pluginname – main.ba2) for it to work, and keep a separate ba2 for textures.

Atomic Radio – PSAs: Leisure Time

Here’s another promotional bit for Atomic Radio. I made some changes to the PSA beyond the typical jokes that make the video not a 100% match, in particular turning the piano player into a man, but it still more or less works. Not really relevant for the radio mod though, since these videos obviously can’t be shown on the Pip-Boy.

Now, there is a TV, but videos that match the original PSA are more the exception than the rule, and I also don’t really like the intersection of real life people in a video game world. So it’s more of a blog thing, but still fun and easy to make.

Fallout 4 Mod – Classical Radio Replacer

So after seeing all the replacer mods out on Nexus, I decided to try and take over one of the vanilla stations just to see if I could. This replaces the Classical Radio station. Obviously it’s not ideal for that reason alone, but there’s a few other limitations in place that may not be completely obvious.

For one, the limited tracks available made it so I had to combine a lot of the sketches and skits. In other words, they’re a lot less random than what you’d find in the Fallout 3 version of Atomic Radio (that version also has music). Lastly, I’m still learning all the new Pre-War companies that have been introduced in this game, so most of the commercials are for previously known corporations.

EDIT: Download a standalone version here.

To install, you need to edit the Fallout4.ini file in the following folder:

DocumentsMy GamesFallout4

Then replace the line

sResourceDataDirsFinal=STRINGS

with

sResourceDataDirsFinal=STRINGS, TEXTURES, MESHES, INTERFACE, MUSIC, SOUND, PROGRAMS, MATERIALS, LODSETTINGS, VIS, MISC, SCRIPTS, SHADERSFX

Technically you only need Sound, but I noticed other mods are listing all the folders in case you are using texture replacers too. Then simply merge the Data folder in the zip file with the one in your Fallout 4 directory.

To uninstall, just delete the files.

I should note that I have not played the game to the end, so I have no idea if the Classical Radio channel – being an Institute owned station – plays any role in the story. The replacer will also play in settings where classical music is ideal for the mood, like in posh areas, so keep that in mind as well. Shit’s mostly for giggles and feedback.

 

He Wouldn't Say

we-know

Welcome to the fifth edition of our weekly mailbag. Again, all the letters below come from real spammers delivered via courier in the game Skyrim. Of course. it’s also a painfully slow system of communication. I got this Thanksgiving letter about three months too late. Damn, that courier is one lollygagging motherfucker.

Either that, or the Dark Brotherhood of Turkeys are a little slow on the uptake. But yes, I murdered that bird and poured gravy on it. It was tasty.

On to the questions:

HVAC repair asks:

People say horseshoes are lucky. Does that mean horses are four times as lucky as any other animal?

If you’re asking about real horses, I haven’t a clue. If you’re asking about Skyrim horses, I’d say it’s more skill than luck. Horses in Skyrim are gravity-defying, spider-stomping, all terrain vehicles. If there’s a mountain between you and your objective, there’s no need to go around it when you can fly over it on your magic, vertically running carriage.

MD flooring wants to know:

If Canada is America’s hat, what does that make South America?

The beard, of course.

dancing baby asks:

I am trying to write this character who loves old music, but the writing feels cheesier than a pizza and cornier than poop. How do I fix this?

Well, it may not need fixing. There are times I think a line is fantastic and yet when you say it comes out so clunky it’s raining pots and pans. Other times the reverse is true, where you can be unsure of a line and now people are quoting it on their blogs.

But for argument’s sake let’s assume it’s broken.

If you deconstruct it, a great line is a combination of words, delivery, and the one thing you can’t control, the listener’s personal taste. A cheesy romantic overture is going to be the greatest writing ever to a teenager in love, and the cringiest piece of purple prose to an elderly cynic.

What you can control is the actor’s delivery and the writing. For example, saying “I play a little gypsy folk” is a lot cooler than saying “I want to be a world-class accordion player.” If saying “Ragnar the Red is my favorite!” feels out of character, take them to a tavern and have them say “Hey, this music isn’t bad. What’s it called?”

motovlogger wonders:

Deathclaws are more powerful than Cazadors, but for some reason they’re less scary. Why is that?

I imagine part of it is cazadors’ proximity to Goodsprings. You have a chance of running into them at obscenely low levels. There’s also the fact that they can fly, but if Deathclaws had wings they’d look like fairies, so that can’t be it.

I think the real reason cazadors are so terrifying is because they will swarm you. It’s the difference between having a scorpion crawl up your arm or dipping your hand into a bucket full of flesh-eating ants. No thank you.

make money online asks:

Bethesda is hosting an E3 Showcase in Hollywood on June 14th. What do you think they will show?

Fallout 4, maybe. A new IP, possibly. And if you’re a truly cynical person, TESO related expansions. But your username would imply you aren’t totally against that.

Billig tannlege oslo asks:

I don’t understand why Zora tries to deliberately get captured. Is she just crazy or does she really enjoy being a victim?

The whole princess act is tongue in cheek. She’s poking fun at the damsel in distress trope, which in essence is poking fun at her former self.

As for why she keeps getting captured, first of all, it’s not on purpose. When you meet she tells you she was on her way to plant cotton for Zora’s field. She implies she does this often (and gets captured as a result) and it’s mostly a self-serving and superficial quest for fame. On the road, she might open up a little and mention she doesn’t go through Whiterun because she isn’t comfortable being looked at given her scars.

However, it isnt until you do her personal quest that she finally reveals the real reason she travels through Brittleshin Pass and risks getting captured. I think it has to do with horkers, but I’m not entirely sure.

A Letter…Not Sure Who From

we-know

Welcome to the fifth edition of our weekly mailbag. Again, all the letters below come from real spammers delivered via courier in the game Skyrim. Of course. it’s also a painfully slow system of communication. I got this Thanksgiving letter about three months too late. Damn, that courier is one lollygagging motherfucker.

Either that, or the Dark Brotherhood of Turkeys are a little slow on the uptake. But yes, I murdered that bird and poured gravy on it. It was tasty.

On to the questions:

HVAC repair asks:

People say horseshoes are lucky. Does that mean horses are four times as lucky as any other animal?

If you’re asking about real horses, I haven’t a clue. If you’re asking about Skyrim horses, I’d say it’s more skill than luck. Horses in Skyrim are gravity-defying, spider-stomping, all terrain vehicles. If there’s a mountain between you and your objective, there’s no need to go around it when you can fly over it on your magic, vertically running carriage.

MD flooring wants to know:

If Canada is America’s hat, what does that make South America?

The beard, of course.

dancing baby asks:

I am trying to write this character who loves old music, but the writing feels cheesier than a pizza and cornier than poop. How do I fix this?

Well, it may not need fixing. There are times I think a line is fantastic and yet when you say it comes out so clunky it’s raining pots and pans. Other times the reverse is true, where you can be unsure of a line and now people are quoting it on their blogs.

But for argument’s sake let’s assume it’s broken.

If you deconstruct it, a great line is a combination of words, delivery, and the one thing you can’t control, the listener’s personal taste. A cheesy romantic overture is going to be the greatest writing ever to a teenager in love, and the cringiest piece of purple prose to an elderly cynic.

What you can control is the actor’s delivery and the writing. For example, saying “I play a little gypsy folk” is a lot cooler than saying “I want to be a world-class accordion player.” If saying “Ragnar the Red is my favorite!” feels out of character, take them to a tavern and have them say “Hey, this music isn’t bad. What’s it called?”

motovlogger wonders:

Deathclaws are more powerful than Cazadors, but for some reason they’re less scary. Why is that?

I imagine part of it is cazadors’ proximity to Goodsprings. You have a chance of running into them at obscenely low levels. There’s also the fact that they can fly, but if Deathclaws had wings they’d look like fairies, so that can’t be it.

I think the real reason cazadors are so terrifying is because they will swarm you. It’s the difference between having a scorpion crawl up your arm or dipping your hand into a bucket full of flesh-eating ants. No thank you.

make money online asks:

Bethesda is hosting an E3 Showcase in Hollywood on June 14th. What do you think they will show?

Fallout 4, maybe. A new IP, possibly. And if you’re a truly cynical person, TESO related expansions. But your username would imply you aren’t totally against that.

Billig tannlege oslo asks:

I don’t understand why Zora tries to deliberately get captured. Is she just crazy or does she really enjoy being a victim?

The whole princess act is tongue in cheek. She’s poking fun at the damsel in distress trope, which in essence is poking fun at her former self.

As for why she keeps getting captured, first of all, it’s not on purpose. When you meet she tells you she was on her way to plant cotton for Zora’s field. She implies she does this often (and gets captured as a result) and it’s mostly a self-serving and superficial quest for fame. On the road, she might open up a little and mention she doesn’t go through Whiterun because she isn’t comfortable being looked at given her scars.

However, it isnt until you do her personal quest that she finally reveals the real reason she travels through Brittleshin Pass and risks getting captured. I think it has to do with horkers, but I’m not entirely sure.